Acker bilk his clarinet and strings - aria


. Jazz Scene Newspaper and website's aim is to present jazz events, Jazz profiles, CD reviews , Jazz club & concert reviews and an interesting cover subject every ...

The idea of 7" singles playing at 33-1/3 rpm was hardly new when Columbia re-introduced that format to the public in 1959. Back in the late 1940s, when Columbia and RCA-Victor were battling to see which speed would replace the 78, Columbia went all the way and started issuing their now-microgroove singles on the 33 speed (see example, below right). They even added radial "rumble strips" around the label to keep them from slipping when on a changer. But they were just weren't popular with record buyers and 45s quickly won out for singles. Columbia had to be content with a victory on albums. By mid-1952, the 7" 33 singles were banished from Columbia's catalog (they had never been in other catalogs).

When rival RCA-Victor jumped in on the stereo 45s in a big way in 1958, Columbia sat back and waited. Ultimately, they totally refused to give in to RCA's stereo-45 singles, although the did start issuing stereo EPs in February, 1959. Instead, they re-introduced their brainchild 33-single, this time in stereo, during the summer of 1959.

A bad idea is also a bad idea ten years later, usually. The record buying public still disliked the 33s. As singles, you couldn't put your thumb through a stack of them to keep from dropping them, and the fidelity wasn't much improvement, if any, to most customers' ears. Within a very few months, Columbia's dream of a single-speed industry (at 33-1/3, of course) failed completely.

By the start of 1960, the only solid customer the stereo-33 single had was the juke box operators, who stocked their stereo juke boxes with them. All the record labels began shipping stereo-33 singles to the juke box people in little packets of five discs, along with title strips for the juke boxes and 5x5-inch slick photos of the album from which the packet was derived. The juke box folks loved it.

A vast majority of the stereo-33 singles listed in this discography started as part of a 5-disc package for juke boxes. By 1962, the idea of selling stereo-33 singles at the local record store was about done, and the juke boxers started going for stereo EPs and "Little LPs" with three songs on each side, costing the listener 25 cents instead of one song for 10 cents. The Little LPs lasted much longer than the stereo- 33 singles, reaching into the 1970s.

We would appreciate any additions or corrections to this discography. Just send them to us via e-mail . Both Sides Now Publications is an information web page. We are not a catalog, nor can we provide the records listed below. We have no association with any of these record labels. Should you be interested in acquiring the stereo singles listed in this discography (which are all out of print), we suggest you see our Frequently Asked Questions page and follow the instructions found there. This story and discography are copyright 2014, 2015 by Mike Callahan.

The repertoire includes pieces by Lennie Tristano (“Wow” and “April”), Warne Marsh (“Marshmallow”), Charlie Parker (“Dexterity”), and Thelonious Monk (“Little Rootie Tootie”), a Bob Hurst tribute to tenor-saxophonist Charlie Rouse (“Roused About”) and three Stein originals. While the music often swings in a free bop fashion, there are also freer explorations and moments of unpredictability. The interplay between bass and contrabass clarinets is intriguing and fascinating with Jackson sometimes stealing the show. While Abrams and Rainey are mostly in supportive roles, they keep the music stimulating throughout.

Bilk continued to tour with his Paramount Jazz Band, as well as performing concerts with his two contemporaries, Chris Barber and Kenny Ball , both of whom were born in 1930, as "The 3Bs". Bilk also provided vocals on many of his tracks, including on "I'm an Old Cowhand", "The Folks Who Live on the Hill", "White Cliffs of Dover", "Travellin On" and "That's My Home".

Heinrich Bearmann's son (1811 - 1885) Carl was a famous player, too, but today he may be even better known as professor for music and author of a clarinet book, that most of the German students still use today. He, too, has helped to improve the mechanics of the instrument.

Starink has also composed his own music but the albums that came out were never as commercially successful as his cover albums. His compositions are rather experimental and often not as accessible as the music he recreated. He released albums called "Cristallin", "Moods - Synthesizer seasons", "The Synthfony album" and more.


Acker Bilk His Clarinet And Strings - AriaAcker Bilk His Clarinet And Strings - AriaAcker Bilk His Clarinet And Strings - AriaAcker Bilk His Clarinet And Strings - Aria

phqok.storybookcruises.us