Pyotr ilyich tchaikovsky peter ilyitch tschaikowsky · hans hagen - nussknackersuite op. 71


He became even more famous, and traveled to other countries in Europe and the United States to conduct his own music . But although he was hugely successful, he was still under the black cloud of depression.

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Peter Tchaikovsky , a Russian master composer. Explore the tragic life and intensely beautiful music of Pyotr Ilyich here...

Works with opus numbers are listed in this section, together with their dates of composition. For a complete list of Tchaikovsky's works, including those without opus numbers, see here. [1] For more detail on dates of composition, see here. [2]

In the spring of 1891 he was invited to conduct in New York where the Carnegie Hall was being opened. He also conducted concerts in Baltimore and Philadelphia . When he returned to Russia he wrote his last ballet The Nutcracker and his Sixth Symphony , known as the “Pathétique” which was dedicated to his nephew with whom he was passionately in love. This work is often considered his best. It was performed in St Petersburg on 16 October 1893. Five days later he suddenly became ill with cholera, a disease many people were catching in the city. Tchaikovsky died four days later. Many people think that he committed suicide by deliberately drinking contaminated water. He may have wanted to (or even been forced to) commit suicide in order to avoid a scandal because he was having a relationship with a nephew of an important aristocratic man. Exactly what happened is still a mystery.

Tchaikovsky's excitement with Swan Lake is evident from the speed with which he composed: commissioned in the spring of 1875, the piece was created within one full year. His letters to Sergei Taneyev from August 1875 indicate, however, that it was not only his excitement that compelled him to create it so quickly but his wish to finish it as soon as possible, so as to allow him to start on an opera. Respectively, he created scores of the first three numbers of the ballet, then the orchestration in the fall and winter, and was still struggling with the instrumentation in the spring. By April 1876, the work was complete. Tchaikovsky's mention of a draft suggests the presence of some sort of abstract but no such draft has ever been seen. Tchaikovsky wrote various letters to friends expressing his longstanding desire to work with this type of music, and his excitement concerning his current stimulating, albeit laborious task. [7]


Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky Peter Ilyitch Tschaikowsky · Hans Hagen - Nussknackersuite Op. 71Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky Peter Ilyitch Tschaikowsky · Hans Hagen - Nussknackersuite Op. 71Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky Peter Ilyitch Tschaikowsky · Hans Hagen - Nussknackersuite Op. 71Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky Peter Ilyitch Tschaikowsky · Hans Hagen - Nussknackersuite Op. 71

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